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Lesson 2 How to pronounce "zi ci si zhi chi shi ri"

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Learn how to pronounce "zi ci si zhi chi shi ri"
Learn how to pronounce "zi ci si zhi chi shi ri"

Comments (28)

I wanted to skip these pinyin beginner lessons at first, but later on I realized, although I´ve already learnt most of it, you always mention something very useful and interesting which I didn´t know. You are a great teacher and I definitely won´t skip any lesson from now on. :-D :-)
pitkoiko123 6 months 2 weeks ago edited
Always good to get a solid foundation first! :)
Jenny at Yoyo Chinese 6 months 2 weeks ago edited
I wanted to skip these pinyin beginner lessons at first, but later on I realized, although I´ve already learnt most of it, you always mention something very useful and interesting which I didn´t know. You are a great teacher and I definitely won´t skip any lesson from now on. :-D :-)
pitkoiko123 6 months 2 weeks ago
So are people named Daniel automatically awesome in China? :) Daniel sounds similar to 大牛 (Dà niú)
Fredrik Ehnbom 1 year 3 months ago
Haha, Daniel does sound close to 大牛 (Dà niú). :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 3 months ago
Instead of tai4 niu2 le! , can we use hen3 niu le ?
amrit02 1 year 4 months ago
It's not quite often used, but it's okay to use. The situation may be a bit different. You may use it to encourage someone that they have already done a great job.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 4 months ago
Such a good lesson!
Josh R Hemond 1 year 4 months ago
We're glad you're enjoying it! Let us know if you have any questions! :)
Micah at Yoyo Chinese 1 year 4 months ago
I like that you take the time to answer questions. What characters do you use for your name? 《秧秧》对吗?谢谢!
Alex Casey 1 year 7 months ago
Thanks for the nice words, Alex. Yes, that correct. :)
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 7 months ago
I'm a bit confused when it comes to Shi(10). "Shi" is one of the "special seven" but it's still pronounced as "shrr". Are there exceptions like this for others or am I just misunderstanding this?
Typhon 1 year 8 months ago
I agree with this confusion. The base sounds in no way lead me into an R sound. Yar'ds' doesn't naturally curl back into an R sound for me; I'd say it plays out as an "uh" if anything. If an R is expected (and it seems to be), I will have to be intentional about it despite the video suggesting I can ignore the ending. This is perhaps a scenario where borrowing from existing language can be a little misleading.
Dave Barnett 3 months 2 weeks ago
The idea of the "special seven" is that the "i" that appears in them is basically just there because the people who created pinyin decided that every syllable has to have a vowel. But in reality, they aren't pronounced with an "i" (or "ee") sound at all. The syllables "zhi" "chi" "shi" and "ri" all have an "r" sound at the end, which is actually just the sound that comes out as a result of your tongue being in the up/back position that's required to to pronounce those initials.
Yoyo Chinese 1 year 8 months ago
謝謝!非常好!
Hodge 1 year 8 months ago
You know, when Yang Yang first recorded this video discussing "the special 7 [trick]", I was really dubious. I was thinking, "Man, that would be nice and easy if it's right, but how can it be? Surely there must be some limitation, or special cases needed." Then in yesterday's new video (9/26/2014), this topic was discussed briefly again, and I got to thinking... if it's wrong, there must be an example where it fails... (cont'd)
Corey 2 years 3 months ago
So I tried to come up with a case where it doesn't work, and could not. And as I did that, it became clear to me what Yang Yang is really saying here, that without changing your tongue position or your mouth shape in any way from the initial, just by adding the "voicing" you get the right "i" sound. It was a revelation to me, and I want to say to whomever initially had this insight, 你是非常聪明!
Corey 2 years 3 months ago
Thank you so much for the nice comments. That's a great way to study. Feel free to let us know whenever you have any hesitation or doubt about Chinese. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 3 months ago
That's strange you tell me that's how the "R" in pīnyīn is pronounced, would that have been changed around in the past 11 years? Because my girlfriend was from the Fuzhou, Fujian province and the R was taught as just R when she was in the Chinese school.
tyler93u 2 years 5 months ago
Sometimes, although it says that the sound doesn't change by adding 'i' it sounds like 'zhir' or 'shir.' Should you pronounce them with an English 'r' sound?
Bilchick 2 years 5 months ago
It does sound bit like there's an "r" sound because you would have to curl your tongue a bit to pronounce it, however, the "r" shouldn't be there though.
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 5 months ago
hi yang yang, ive been enjoying your pinyin teaching.. still has far to go but has been encouraged through your lessons that it is now a do-able task :) thank you for your superb way of teaching.. keep up the good work! 你太牛了 !
Joseph 2 years 8 months ago
Thank you so much for the encouraging comments. Have fun studying. :)
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 7 months ago
This is a really simple learning mechanism for someone as a Mayguo ren like me. I know the pronunciation for the word ten puts emphasis on a new (r) throat sound which I think is a bit more complex than simply saying the word sure (between shoe and sure), but the way you teach is awesome for memorizing, and very helpful to me.
jordan.parks.790 2 years 8 months ago
你的视频太牛了!Thank you for the fun lesson!
Kiarah 2 years 8 months ago
Yang yang my interpretation is different than yours; yours isn't right. S and c are not voiced. I think the c is very aspirated. Z is voiced. The i stands for a vowel placement holder. Even though it is not sounded as an "i" vowel it gives the cue to someone to produce an interpretation of an unknown vowel which in effect just produces this voicing - all vowels are voiced. When you are hearing the voicing is because of the "i"; it is not the consonant sound s and c prior to it.
gordon 2 years 9 months ago
Hi Gordon, it seems like you and Yangyang are in agreement on this! What she's saying here is that, after the "special seven," the "i" has no sound of its own, but indicates the holding and voicing of the preceding consonant sound. So, when followed by "i," the "s," "c," and "z" are then voiced. And yes, the "c" is aspirated!
Yoyo Chinese 2 years 8 months ago
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